About us

The Birmingham Research in Imagery and Observation (BRIO) Group
The BRIO group is made up of academic staff and post graduate students based at the University of Birmingham. Led by Dr Jennifer Cumming and Dr Sarah Williams, the group are passionate about furthering the understanding of what makes imagery and observation effective in the areas of sport, exercise, dance, and rehabilitation.

BRIO group

BRIO Group members

Dr Jennifer Cummig CPsychol CSci AFBPs
Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Jennifer Cumming BRIO imagery
My applied and research interests: I have over 15 years of research experience and into the effective use of imagery for sport, exercise, dance, and more recently, rehabilitation settings. My focus has been on the development of valid and reliable measurement tools (e.g., the Sport Imagery Ability Questionnaire, the Movement Imagery Questionnaire-3, the Functions of Observational Learning Questionnaire), establishing techniques for improving imagery ability (e.g., layered stimulus response training, observation), and improving the credibility of imagery interventions by implementing appropriate screening and manipulation checks. As a Chartered Psychologist with the British Psychological Society, I have extensive experience putting this research into practice by developing bespoke imagery training for a range of client groups of all ages, from World Champion athletes to recreational exercisers.

Twitter: @drjenncumming

Staff profile: Jennifer Cumming 

Website: www.drjennifercumming.com

 

Dr Sarah Williams
Lecturer in Sport Psychology and Coaching Sciences, School of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Sarah Williams
Research Interests: My research is on effective imagery use to enhance performance, health, and well-being. Specifically, I have developed techniques such as observation and Layered Stimulus Response Training to enhance imagery ability and effectiveness. I am also interested in examining individual factors (e.g., personality characteristics, skill level) that are likely to contribute to the impact imagery can have. I have a particular interest in how imagery and its impact can be evaluated. To examine this I have created valid and reliable questionnaires (Sport Imagery Ability Questionnaire and Movement Imagery Questionnaire-3). In my research, I use these in conjunction with a range of other methodological approaches including: mental chronometry, hand laterality, Doppler echocardiography, Electrocardiography, and various performance and psychological outcome measures. I am interested in how using these different tools and techniques and considering individual factors can be used to help various populations experience more effective imagery. This ranges from promoting physical activity in sedentary individuals, to people making a quicker recovery following hemiparesis. I am also particularly interested in how imagery can be used to alter psychological and physiological responses to acute and long-term psychological stress.

Twitter: @DrSarahWilliams

Staff profile: Sarah Williams

 

Nurwina Anuar
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Nurwina Anuar
I graduated from Universiti Teknologi Malaysia and I have studied the application of emotive imagery for young children. I am really interested in imagery and broaden my research area in sport. My primary area of research interest is the differences of individual’s imagery ability. I am interested broadly in factors that affect individual`s ability to image and it also involves the PETTLEP imagery, movement observation as well as mindfulness. My recent research has focused the affect of emotion regulation to the vividness of image and the easiness to create an image.

Twitter: @NurwinaAnuar

Doctoral research profile: Nurwina Anuar

 

Mary Quinton
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Mary Quinton
I graduated from the University of Birmingham with a BSc Hons in Sport & Exercise Sciences. I am now a second year doctoral researcher with the focus of my PhD being the investigation of athletes’ positive and negative imagery experiences. More specifically, I am interested in whether who you are (i.e., personality traits, imagery ability) can affect how you perceive different images (i.e., helpful or harmful).

My previous research has involved conducting a PETTLEP imagery intervention with young futsal players, determining its effect on imagery ability, and dribbling and passing performance.  This research was presented at the conference for the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (2012).

Another research area interest of mine centers around mental skills training interventions. The first year of my PhD focused on the investigation into which psychological skills and techniques are required for optimal performance in elite players at a premiership football academy. I presented this research at the British Psychological Society, Division of Sport and Exercise Science Conference in Manchester last year. We have also been approached by a youth homeless charity and have recently been conducting focus groups with key stakeholders to determine what psychological skills this particular group requires, which will inform a mental skills training program.

Twitter: @Mary_q6

 

Sam Cooley
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Sam Cooley
I am interested in the cognitive and emotional effects of imagery use and how imagery can be used to improve people’s experiences of sport and physical activity. My research to date has focused on the methodologies used in the design and delivery of imagery interventions; how a person’s imagery ability can be trained and improved; and the effect of imagery use on physiological responses, exercise motivation and skill execution. During this research I have delivered imagery interventions to various populations including both athletes and sedentary individuals.

Twitter: @samjoecooley

Doctoral research profile: Sam Cooley

 

Gale
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

My background is rehabilitation science specialised in physiotherapy exercises. During my masters degree I studied rehabilitation exercise science in the school of sport, health and rehabilitation science exercises in Bangor Wales. As a physiotherapist I have come across many neurological and neuromuscular cases that I have diagnosed and designed treatment plans for them in order to enhance their recovery stage with an optimum outcome on their neuromuscular level such as balance, gait, muscle strengthen, ADL and also general wellbeing. This has lead me to pursue new approaches and treatment strategies such as motor imagery to enhance patients recovery. The aim of my PhD is to establish imagery measures and training techniques that can be used in physiotherapy to facilitate rehabilitation. My current research is investigating the use of mirror therapy and motor imagery in conjunction with rehabilitation exercises with post stroke survivors. We seek to identify the impact specific imagery training can have on this type of population.

Twitter: @nightingale700

Doctoral researcher profile: Gale

 

Maria-Christina Kosteli
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Maria-Christina
I graduated from the University of Athens in Greece with a BSc Hons in Psychology. I received my Master’s in Athletic Counseling from Springfield College in USA. I am now a second year doctoral researcher at the University of Birmingham with the focus of my PhD being exercise imagery use in older adults. More specifically, I am interested in whether imagery can be used as a technique to promote physical activity levels in insufficiently active older adults. Another research interest of mine centres around people who are suffering from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Specifically, I am interested in exploring beliefs about physical activity and mental imagery in patients with COPD. The goal is to create an intervention that will use guided imagery to promote self-efficacy in patients with COPD.

Twitter: @mc_kosteli

Doctoral researcher profile: Maria-Christina Kosteli

 

Fredrik Weibull
Doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology, School of Sport, Exercise, & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham

Fredrik Weibull imagery BRIO University of Birmingham Sport psychology Träna tanken Mental träning Mental training
The focus of my PhD is on effective exercise imagery use and how to improve exercise imagery ability. I have for example investigated if it is possible to increase self-efficacy and imagery ability among women who want to exercise more and how different types of imagery at different exercise intensities, during a cycling task, influence perceived exertion and a number of psychological variables. I am also interested in effective imagery use and imagery ability in sport and rehabilitation and I have my own business working with clients in both business and sports.

Twitter: @FredrikWeibull

Doctoral researcher profile: Fredrik Weibull

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s