You have been using imagery your entire life but you did not even realize it!

By Nurwina Anuar

Have you ever lost your car key? To find them, you might have thought back to the last place and time you held them in your hands, mentally retracing your steps.  Without even realizing it, you were using mental imagery. Following on from Fernanda’s post explaining why imagery is a skill for life, I will explore this theme further by giving you lots more reasons how it can benefit you.

What is imagery?

Imagery is a mental activity.  Using your mind’s eye, you can recreate experiences you have had before or picture new experiences before they even happen.  In a classic study by Harvard University’s Prof Stephen Kosslyn and his colleagues (1990), they discovered that most spontaneous images experienced in every day life are visual in nature.  However, you may also use your mind’s ear to hear imaged sounds, your mind’s noise to experience imaged smells, and so on for the other senses.  Helping to make the images even more realistic, it is also possible to experience feelings and emotions during imagery.

Although imagery is most often considered to be a technique used by top sports people, it can be applied to almost every type of profession.  For example, imagery is used by writers, dancers, actors, musicians, psychologists, entrepreneurs, and surgeons.  Because most of everyday images are spontaneously created, we probably do not realize how often we use imagery to help us through our daily lives.

By becoming more aware of imagery and optimizing your ability to image, you will be able to use this technique to benefit in many ways.  In Kosslyn et al.’s (1990) study, they found that everyday images were used to:

  1. Solve problems (e.g., decide what to eat)
  2. Rehearse future encounters (e.g., asking your boss for a raise)
  3. Jogging your memory (e.g., putting a face to remember a forgotten name)
  4. Producing descriptions (e.g., giving directions to your house)
  5. Understanding descriptions (e.g., picturing a character in a book)
  6. Emotional/motivational (e.g., imaging a calm lake to relax)

Imagery can also have no particular purpose, such as when we are day dreaming.  However, to benefit most from imagery we need to be aware of inner experiences and focus the mind on what we are creating/recreating.  Like other mental techniques, you can improve your ability to image by practicing it regularly and deliberately.

Still not convinced why you should start to use imagery more often in your life? Here are five more reasons.

1. It is free

Imagery is a tool that does not require a single penny in order to use it. You don’t need an ap or a CD – just the power of your mind.

2. It can be used any time/any place

You can use it at any point of the day (or night!), whether it is first thing in the morning, during a break in work, or just before trying to fall asleep.  You can also use it anywhere you like. For example, athletes have reported using imagery at school, at home, as well as on the training pitch.

3. There is a scientific explanation for its benefits

Dr Aymeric Guillot, a professor at the Centre of Research and Innovation in Sport at University Claude Bernard Lyon in France has explained that experiences in real and imaginary worlds produces similar responses in the central nervous system.   During a “mental workout”, your sympathetic nervous system which governs our fight-or-flight response will react with increases in heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure. He further said, “Whether we walk on a mountain trail or only picture it, we activate many of the same neural networks—paths of interconnected nerve cells that link what your body does to the brain impulses that control it. You can use this to your advantage in different ways.”

4 You get to preview experiences before you take the action.

You don’t just relive old experiences through imagery but also can preview new experiences before they happen.  Why is this helpful? Imaging the situation before you experience for real can give you a sense of having done it before and build your confidence that the actual situation will go well.  Also, this mental rehearsal can help you to gain information on how to handle the situation, giving you the opportunity to try out different scenarios, changing your tactics, and reviewing possible outcomes.  This kind of imaged planning may even save time and money, allowing you to consider creative solutions to problems.

5. Imagery have been used for healing and medicine.

Imagery can help you to reduce pain and promote healing from injury and illness.  Pain can be reduced by using imagery to distract yourself, relaxing your muscles, and holding less tension.  You could image the sensation of getting massage, sitting on warm beach, taking hot bath, the muscles relaxing, or imagining the pain being released from the body.  As for healing, athletes will image image the fractured bone stick back together and other types images. This gives them a sense of control over their rehabilitation and perhaps confidence that it is working. Interested to know more about using imagery for pain and healing? Check out this resource.

In sum, imagery can be used in every day life to achieve many benefits. I would love to hear how you use imagery in your life by leaving a comment below.

About the author: Nurwina Anuar is a final year PhD student at the University of Birmingham.  

Imagery: A skill for life?

By Fernanda Serra de Queiroz

I would like to thank the BRIO group for the opportunity to talk a little bit about my PhD research topic in this blog. I’m doing my PhD at the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia) under the supervision of Prof. Stephanie Hanrahan. During the first semester of 2015 I’m at the University of Birmingham learning about imagery with the BRIO group crew.

Sport psychologists normally look at how teaching mental skills to athletes can be beneficial for enhancing performance and enjoyment of participation. Athletes use these mental skills for situations such as coping with performance under pressure, decision making and concentration, setting goals, recover after mistakes among other things. What I’m interested in investigating is how the skills athletes use to cope with the aforementioned situations can also be useful in areas of life outside of sport.

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Daily Life vs. Sport

It is possible to argue that there are many similarities with daily life and sports. An important presentation to your boss and colleagues at work could be as stress provoking as playing your sport in front of a big crowd. We could probably deal more effectively with these challenges of daily life if we had the appropriate set of skills. This “set of skills” have been named as “life skills”.

According to Gould and Carson (2008), life skills can be considered as internal assets, characteristics and skills. Life skills can be “behavioural (communicating effectively with peers and adults) or cognitive (making effective decisions); interpersonal (being assertive) or intrapersonal (setting goals)” (Danish et al., 2004, p. 40). Thus could imagery be a life skill?

Referring back to this blog first post by Dr Jennifer Cumming, she mentioned that regular and effective use of imagery could speed the road to success in sport and help athletes to cope better with adversities. The use of imagery has been associated with many positive outcomes such as increase in sport confidence and a strategy to cope with pre-competitive anxiety. Athletes can use imagery to mentally prepare for performance, to rehearse plans and routines, and to manage emotion and physiological arousal.

Returning to the first example of the work presentation, could imagery be used in that situation to help with pre-presentation jitters? A mental rehearsal of the presentation could probably increase the confidence of the office worker. Thus imagery could be considered as a life skill.

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Unfortunately we are not taught imagery, and people may even confuse with day dreaming (e.g. if I win the lottery I will…). However the importance of “positive thinking” and of being “confident” is a message that is widely spread. Importantly, the research on the sport psychology has shown imagery is a skill that could help people to think of positive scenarios and increase confidence.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 1999) because life skills are abilities, they can be taught and practiced. The WHO advocates for life skills to be taught at schools, this organization believes that life skills can shape personal actions, or actions towards others, or even actions that positively change the surrounding. Therefore it is important to learn and practice life skills such as imagery. So I would suggest you to keep following this blog and get some valuable insight on the use of imagery with the BRIO specialists.

About the author: Fernanda Serra de Queiroz is a PhD student studying life skills at the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia).  

It works for you but it does not make sense to me: How to use exercise imagery in a meaningful way

By Fredrik Weibull

You are running on a muddy trail in the forest. The rain is pouring down and you are completely soaked while keeping a high tempo. You have been exhausted for the last 20 minutes and you do not really know how but you keep pushing yourself forward. Your thighs, shoulders and calves are burning and you are now running up a steep hill. With rapid and powerful arm movements you are helping your legs carry you upwards, forcing yourself up the hill using maximal effort. You have three more miles to go and you will keep this pace. There is no alternative. Keep moving forward, fight!

How do you feel when reading this scenario? One might read itand think “what an idiot, why do that to yourself?”, while another one might think “Wow, I would like to be there right now, testing myself and pushing my limits”. What is cool about imagery is that the same image can affect two people in two completely different ways.

Images affects you whatever you do, whether you image yourself successfully taking a penalty in football, giving a presentation at work, cleaning your home or completing a workout in the swimming pool. In this blog post, I am going to focus on exercise imagery.

Exercise imagery
Exercise imagery is a very common self-regulation strategy and it is used by both people who rarely exercise and people who exercise vigorously every day. Exercisers image everything from how they want to look when they are fit to feeling refreshed and proud after an aerobics class. They use it to motivate themselves to exercise, increase their belief that they can perform a difficult routine and to experience more enjoyment during exercise. Research has shown it is possible to use imagery to increase your barrier-self efficacy, improve the quality of your motivation and improve your feeling states in relation to exercise.

When you image something it will affect you in positive ways.  These changes can range from being very subtle but to very noticeable. An image can make you happy, upset or motivated. How you are affected by it depends on how well you can create the image, how you interpret the image and what meaning the image has for you. Now I will provide you with some thoughts and tips on how to make your images more meaningful.

How to make your images more meaningful
It is only you who can decide if your images are meaningful for you in a specific situation and if they have the desired effect. There are different things to consider when you are trying to make images more meaningful for you.

A good place to start is to think about what you want to gain from your imagery use. Let us say that you want to use imagery to push yourself harder during a gym session. What images comes to mind? Can you use these images and work from them. Maybe you see and feel yourself pushing yourself really heard, your are exhausted but keep fighting or you image yourself reaching one of your performance goals (e.g., run 10 kilometers in under 40 minutes or swimming 500 meters without resting).

If the image motivates you, image it again and reflect on how it makes you feel. Can you perhaps add something to it that makes you even more motivated? Perhaps image hearing a specific music track while exercising, image sweating or feeling powerful. Play around and try different alternatives.

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Think about what makes you push yourself harder during the next gym session. Maybe you can use this behavior, these cues and feelings in your images. Write them down so you do not forget them. Image it there and then so that you learn how to image it when it is fresh in your mind. Rehearse it again after the session and again when you get home.

One good rule of thumb when using imagery is to include the same details in your image that you want to experience in the specific situation. For example, when you cycle you perhaps focus on how your legs feel powerful and that you are maintaining a smooth and consistent pace. When imaging cycling try to focus on these details. However, the twist here is that it should still feel meaningful for you. Maybe this does not make it feel more meaningful. Maybe it feels more important to focus on maintaining a good cycling position and to focus on the sounds the bicycle makes in your images.

If it feels real and lifelike but perhaps annoying or useless, it is probably not the right image to use for you. Or perhaps you are not using it in the right way. Maybe you need to image it during a longer duration.

It is good to consider that some things require practice. If you learn a new golf swing you will not have good results straight away, you may need thousands of swings before it feels right and you can execute it correctly. The same goes with a new image. Maybe it is difficult to image it during your first tries, maybe you include too many or too few details and maybe it takes some time before you get used to the idea of that image. Be patient.

I suggest that you evaluate your images after your workout. Did they have the desired effect? Think about what worked, what did not work, and adjust your images the next time.

If you used an image that helped get you off the sofa and into the gym? What was that image? Write it down. Perhaps you can use it again.

Please add your comments below to let me know how you use imagery when you exercise and what do you do to create meaningful images.

Interested to know more? Here is a good book chapter. You can also join us for our upcoming imagery workshop on how to improve imagery ability and to write imagery scripts.

About the author: Fredrik Weibull is a doctoral researcher in Sport and Exercise Psychology at the University of Birmingham. He also works applied with performance psychology in both sport and business. Talk to him on Twitter: @FredrikWeibull

Imagery in exercise and physical activity: You can be whatever you make up your mind to be

By Maria-Christina Kosteli

Are you among these people who are constantly looking for excuses to avoid going to the gym? Do you want to start exercising but you find it difficult? Imagery can be the answer to your question. In this post, my goal is to explain how imagery can be a very powerful tool as well as give you some tips and suggestions on how to use it.

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Why imagery is so  powerful?

Have you heard the notion that for whatever you can imagine you can achieve? Basically, imagery can give you the confidence that you can do something and help you prepare for it. It has been extensively used by athletes and has been shown to be associated with successful performance. But athletes are not the only ones who can benefit from it.

How does imagery work and how can it be used in exercise?

Previous research has shown that when you imagine yourself exercising it is more likely that you will end up doing it. Are you wondering why? Simply put, your brain does not differentiate very much between a real event and an imagined one. It is like tricking your mind that you are exercising without really moving from your chair.  So when you imagine yourself exercising, you may experience same feelings and sensations as if you were actually doing it.

For example:

  • if you imagine yourself lifting weights you might experience tension in your muscles.
  • You could feel your heart beating faster while you imagine walking with fast pace in the treadmill.
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It is important to note that not everyone is able to imagine kinesthetically and experience the movement or the sensation associated with it. Some people can easily visualize but have a hard time experiencing a picture as a sound or smell. This is why imagery is also known as visualization. However, imagery is multifaceted and is not limited to one sensation.

When to use imagery?

When you use imagery it is important that you know what you want to achieve. If for example you have fear that you might not be able to do a certain move, it would be wise if you picture yourself completing the workout. Thus, some people use imagery to improve their skills and technique while engaging in a certain activity. This can happen by simply picturing yourself doing an exercise correctly. In this way you convince yourself that you can actually do it even if it is challenging. Thus, imagery can build your confidence and motivate you to do things you would never imagine you could do. Make sure that what you imagine is as close as possible to what you want to achieve.

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What happens with people who are totally unmotivated to initiate physical activity? 

If you are among the people who have a hard time getting out of their sofa, you can start by picturing yourself getting ready and preparing to go for a run or a walk. Think about all the things that you do prior to commencing exercise such as putting athletic attire on, getting a flask with water, or even grabbing your iPod if you enjoy listening to the music while you exercise. The more details you include in your imagery the more effective it will be. In imagery you can use all your sensations to make it as realistic and vivid as possible. Imagery can also be used as a way to overcome difficult situations. Let’s say for example that it is raining and you feel unmotivated to get ready to go to the gym. What you could do is to imagine a warm bath or a cup of tea after completing your goal. In other words, picturing the reward at the end of exercise can motivate you to actually do it.

Can everybody use imagery?

Although some people are better than others in formulating images, this does not mean that imagery is limited to certain people. Imagery is a skill and it is something that you can improve on. The same way you engage in physical training, you can also have mental training. Thus, the more you practice imagery, the better you will become. You can use imagery anywhere and at any time. For example, you can use imagery before you start exercising or during exercise, in your car, before you go to bed etc. If you are still unsure if imagery is for you, you should try it out for yourself. You might be amazed with how powerful it can be.

About the Author: Maria-Christina Kosteli is a final year PhD student in Sport and Exercise Psychology at the School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham. The opinions expressed in this post are my own.

Imagery interventions with children: Top tips for researchers, parents, and coaches!

By Mary Quinton

For my first post for the BRIO group blog, I would like to share with you the top tips I learned from conducting an imagery intervention with a population that requires a different approach to that typically undertaken with most athletes – children.
I’ll summarize with some practical tips aimed at parents, coaches, and researchers for incorporating imagery into practice sessions for youth athletes. But first, let me tell you what we did in our intervention that allows me to give you advice!

What did we do?
We conducted a five week imagery intervention with a group of 36 young Futsal players to see whether imagery practiced twice a week could improve their:

  1. Ability to generate images (i.e., imagery ability)
  2. Performance on a dribbling and passing Futsal task.*

*Note: For a more detailed description of our methodology and results please see the full text article: Quinton, M. L., Cumming, J., Gray, R., Geeson, J. R., Cooper, A., Crowley, H., & Williams, S. E. (2014). A PETTLEP imagery intervention with young athletes. Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity, 9, 47-59. doi:10.1515/jirspa-2014-0003

Watch Futsal in action with the top 10 goals from the 2008 FIFA Futsal World Cup in Brazil:


What’s the science behind it?

Our imagery intervention was based on the PETTLEP model (see Holmes & Collins, 2001 for further details). PETTLEP refers to seven elements to consider when designing an imagery intervention: Physical, Environment, Time, Task, Learning, Emotion, and Perspective.

Watch this example on how PETTLEP can be applied in golf:


For maximum benefits, all seven elements should be included in the imagery. Why? Simply put, imagery activates similar areas of the brain to physical practice (Jeannerod, 1997). The extent to which these areas overlap has been termed functional equivalence (or more recently behavioural matching; Wakefield, Smith, Moran, & Holmes, 2013) and is thought to be the reason why imagery has such a powerful effect on performance.

Therefore, including all seven PETTLEP elements in imagery more accurately reflects physical performance (i.e., greater functional equivalence) and can enhance the detail and vividness of the image.

How did we do it?
The imagery content included various dribbling and passing exercises, which related to the futsal skills the young athletes learned. We introduced PETTLEP elements gradually, starting with the most simple ones (e.g., physical – imaging dressed in their kit) and ending with the more complex elements (e.g., emotion – imaging feeling confident doing the skills).

We broke the imagery down into manageable size pieces for a number of reasons:

  1. Children learn skills more effectively when they are broken down, also known as “chaining” (Slocum & Tiger, 2011)
  2. We wanted to ensure the children were not “overloaded” with information at the start. Too much information may cause a lack of focus; an issue especially relevant with children!
  3. This layering approach, known as Layered Stimulus Response Training (LSRT), has been shown to improve imagery ability and performance (Williams, Cooley, & Cumming, 2013). If you want to learn more about LSRT, why not come to our workshop? Click here to find out more.

What did we find?
Although our intervention did not significantly improve performance, we did find age to be significantly related to certain types of imagery ability. In other words, older children found it easier to image certain perspectives in relation to younger children.

So what?
So…this finding has important implications for delivering imagery interventions with children. If older children find it easier to image than younger children, then interventions should be delivered according to age group. This approach would allow for the intervention to be delivered at the correct pace to those involved – in accordance with the learning element of the PETTLEP model.

The bit you’ve all been waiting for…
The tips! Sometimes non-significant results tell us more than significant ones and in the case of this study, that is very true. By no means is the below an extensive list, but from my experience these are what I think are the key points to address in future imagery interventions with children:

Tips for researchers 

  • Aim for small, similar intervention groups: As different people vary in imagery ability (e.g., age, experience level), this ensures the imagery is specific to the group you are working with.
  • Alter the imagery content/delivery to engage children: E.g., use pictures to demonstrate different ways for the children to see their images as in the Movement Imagery Questionnaire for Children (Carter, Yoxon, Ste-Marie, Cumming, & Martini, 2013).
  • Keep coaches and parents informed and involved: Informing parents and coaches about the intervention will help integrate imagery into other areas (e.g., training or practicing at home).
  • Don’t overload children with lots of imagery content: Use the LSRT approach to go at the right pace for youth athletes.

Tips for parents/coaches

  • Ask researchers about the imagery intervention: This will allow you to reinforce the concept and encourage the children to practice imagery outside of the intervention.
  • Encourage frequent imagery use: Research has shown improvements from imagery when practiced at least 3 times a week (Wakefield & Smith, 2009).
  • Use props and small movements: E.g., if the imagery is football based, have players image with a ball at their feet. This makes the imagery more interactive and also uses the Physical element of the PETTLEP model!

Thank you for taking the time to read this blog. Have you had any experience with imagery and youth athletes? If so, we’d love to hear what works best for you! Please leave any comments in the box below. Don’t forget to check out our other blogs too!

References

  • Carter, M. J., Yoxon, E., Ste-Marie, D. M., Cumming, J., & Martini, R. (2013). The validation of a movement imagery questionnaire for children (MIQ-C). Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 35, S16–59.
  • Holmes, P. S., & Collins, D. J. (2001). The PETTLEP approach to motor imagery: A functional equivalence model for sports psychologists. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 13(1), 60–83. doi:10.1080/10413200109339004
  • Jeannerod, M. (1997). The cognitive neuroscience of action. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
  • Slocum, S. K., & Tiger, J. H. (2011). An assessment of the efficiency of and child preference for forward and backward chaining. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44(4), 793–805. doi:10.1901/jaba.2011.44-793
  • Quinton, M. L., Cumming, J., Gray, R., Geeson, J. R., Cooper, A., Crowley, H., & Williams, S. E. (2014). A PETTLEP imagery intervention with young athletes. Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity, 9, 47-59. doi:10.1515/jirspa-2014-0003
  • Wakefield, C. J., & Smith, D. (2009). Impact of differing frequencies of PETTLEP imagery on netball shooting performance. Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity, 4(1), 1–11. doi:10.2202/1932-0191.1043
  • Wakefield, C., Smith, D., Moran, A. P., & Holmes, P. (2013). Functional equivalence or behavioural matching? A critical reflection on 15 years of research using the PETTLEP model of motor imagery. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 6(1), 105–121. doi:10.1080/1750984X.2012.724437
  • Williams, S. E., Cooley, S. J., & Cumming, J. (2013). Layered stimulus response training improves motor imagery ability and movement execution. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 35, 60–71.

About the Author: Mary Quinton is a final year PhD student in Sport and Exercise Psychology at the School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham. The views and opinions expressed in this post are entirely my own.